Medicare Part A

Medicare Part AMedicare Part A usually begins when turning age 65. Medicare Part A coverage is typically free if you or a spouse paid Medicare taxes during your working career. The majority of Americans are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A when they are 65 years old. To receive Part A you must be already eligible to receive retirement benefits, either through Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board. However, you do don’t have to be actively collecting Social Security benefits as many people wait to file. Disabled Americans who are under age 65 and receive Social Security or Railroad Retirement disability benefits are often eligible for Part A after 24 months, and those diagnosed with End-Stage Renal Disease can obtain Medicare Part A.

Key Points of Medicare Part A

  • Americans may receive their Medicare Card three months before their 65th birthday
  • If you receive Social Security checks and turn 65, you are enrolled in Medicare Part A automatically
  • Most Part A beneficiaries will pay zero premium if they contributed 40 or more quarters of work
  • Medicare Part A becomes effective the 1st day of the month of the beneficiaries 65th birthday

What does Medicare Part A Cover?

Medicare Part A is mostly associated with inpatient hospital care. Here is what you pay:

  • $1,184 annual hospital deductible
  • Days 61-90: $322 per a day
  • Days 91 and later (while using 60 lifetime reserve days): $644 per a day

Important: After lifetime reserve days are used Medicare pays nothing, the beneficiary is responsible for all hospital charges.

Keep in mind the above information only lists costs for Medicare Part A. You would also have Medicare Part B costs.

Blood covered under Medicare Part A

Part A annually covers the first three pints of blood at no cost to the beneficiary. The Medicare beneficiary is responsible for paying for all additional pints of blood per calendar year.

What Else does Part A Cover?

Medicare Part A covers expenses that are incurred during a stay in the hospital as well as brief Home Health services for some situations, and sometimes brief Hospice care and Skilled Nursing Facility care, and occasionally Nursing Home care, provided you are not merely in need of assistance with daily living. Mental health care is also a covered service when admitted to a hospital as an in-patient.

Medicare Part A does not cover cosmetic surgery, acupuncture, eye exams for the purpose of prescribing glasses, most dental work, dentures, standard foot care, custodial care or hearing aids and the exams required for fitting them.

Need Help Understanding Medicare Part A?

The easiest way to get help with understanding Medicare Part A is to fill out a request online to speak with us. It only takes ten or fifteen minutes to do a brief overview to Medicare Parts A and B. In the event that more information is needed, we could help direct you to your local Social Security office for an in person appointment.

While Medicare may seem confusing, we strongly urge you to contact us sooner than later. We find many Americans spend a great deal of time looking at the wrong Medicare products or over complicating how Medicare works. Sometimes a nice conversation with a knowledgeable person, can greatly ease the tensions that come with learning something knew and transitioning to Medicare.

What if I want Medicare with No Co-pays or Deductibles?

Medicare with no cost sharing is no problem. About 25% of all Medicare recipients have Part A and Part B. They add a Medicare Supplement to cover their deductibles and co-pays, and Part D, a prescription drug plan. Our office can easily help with this process. As always, our services are no cost to you.

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